Creating spaces and places for young people

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Consultation has concluded

Young people use public spaces just as much as anyone else, if not more.

And yet, too often young people, or young adults between the ages of 12 to 25, are not included in the process of Placemaking and end up “loitering” in other spaces.

Some communities frown upon loitering, which can create a negative image for young people and just contributes to the stigma surrounding them, especially those who are at risk. By being actively engaged in youth-friendly spaces, young people can feel like they have investment in their community and they can develop a strong sense of ownership in these places (Project for Public Spaces, http://www.pps.org/blog/young-people-and-placemaking-engaging-youth-to-create-community-places/).

Young people have as much right as any other demographic to use and enjoy public space in ways that suit their needs. However, most public space is designed to cater for the needs of children and adults.

Spaces for young people can range from:

  • cost-friendly options like attractive street furniture with welcoming design of the space around it,

  • ‘legal walls’ (to allow young people to express themselves freely through public art),

  • to more expensive investments in specialised facilities like playgrounds that cater for the play needs of teenagers, BMX tracks, skate parks, parkour facilities, or youth centres.

Then, there are also many personal interests that transcend the various age groups.

Facilities and planning for the needs of such particular communities of interest may also attract young people who share that interest; examples of these include sporting facilities, music rehearsal rooms and arts hubs.

In order to successfully provide spaces for young people it is vital to include them in the process as full members of the community

An example where this has happened successfully in our Council area is the skate park at Gumeracha, where Council worked with a large group of young skaters throughout the process, resulting in the original user group taking a great sense of ownership over the facility, which to date has only attracted very modest levels of graffiti-vandalism.

What social and recreational activities for young people do you want to see in the district? Use the mapping tool below to show us where you want to hang out, or tell us your ideas about great activities for the district.


Young people use public spaces just as much as anyone else, if not more.

And yet, too often young people, or young adults between the ages of 12 to 25, are not included in the process of Placemaking and end up “loitering” in other spaces.

Some communities frown upon loitering, which can create a negative image for young people and just contributes to the stigma surrounding them, especially those who are at risk. By being actively engaged in youth-friendly spaces, young people can feel like they have investment in their community and they can develop a strong sense of ownership in these places (Project for Public Spaces, http://www.pps.org/blog/young-people-and-placemaking-engaging-youth-to-create-community-places/).

Young people have as much right as any other demographic to use and enjoy public space in ways that suit their needs. However, most public space is designed to cater for the needs of children and adults.

Spaces for young people can range from:

  • cost-friendly options like attractive street furniture with welcoming design of the space around it,

  • ‘legal walls’ (to allow young people to express themselves freely through public art),

  • to more expensive investments in specialised facilities like playgrounds that cater for the play needs of teenagers, BMX tracks, skate parks, parkour facilities, or youth centres.

Then, there are also many personal interests that transcend the various age groups.

Facilities and planning for the needs of such particular communities of interest may also attract young people who share that interest; examples of these include sporting facilities, music rehearsal rooms and arts hubs.

In order to successfully provide spaces for young people it is vital to include them in the process as full members of the community

An example where this has happened successfully in our Council area is the skate park at Gumeracha, where Council worked with a large group of young skaters throughout the process, resulting in the original user group taking a great sense of ownership over the facility, which to date has only attracted very modest levels of graffiti-vandalism.

What social and recreational activities for young people do you want to see in the district? Use the mapping tool below to show us where you want to hang out, or tell us your ideas about great activities for the district.


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In which localities, towns or places could these activities occur?

about 4 years

Indicate on the map where you would like recreational and social activities to take place

Indicate on the map where you would like recreational and social activities to take place

CLOSED: This map consultation has concluded