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Providing Feedback

What is Council seeking feedback on?

Council is seeking feedback on the draft Burning Permit Policy and the proposed township boundaries.

Why is Council seeking community feedback on the draft Burning Permit Policy?

Undertaking community engagement on the proposed draft Burning Permit Policy will ensure community views are considered in the development of the policy and township boundaries.


Who else is Council seeking feedback from?

In addition to the community consultation Council is also seeking feedback from the Environment Protection Agency and the SA Country Fire Service.

How else can I provide feedback on the draft Policy?

  1. Complete the online survey
  2. Add your quick thoughts to the brainstorming board
  3. Attend a drop in session
  4. Provide a written submission to:
    Adelaide Hills Council
    PO Box 44
    Woodside SA 5244

Township Boundaries

What are the proposed township boundaries?

The proposed boundaries for each township are shown on separate maps available here. The maps are listed alphabetically by town name for ease of reference.


Why do the township boundaries need to be declared?

The EPA has requested all Councils to review the status of their township definitions to ensure they meet the meaning of townships as defined in the Environment Protection (Air Quality) Policy 2016.  Where township definitions are out of date or have not been defined, Councils are required to define township boundaries, by way of formal resolution, and declare these in accordance with the Local Government Act 1999, and via an advert in the Government Gazette.

Why have the township boundaries been selected the way they are?

The proposed township boundaries have been selected in the first instance to be consistent with townships contained within Council’s Development Plan.  In some areas these base maps have been expanded to include additional properties that have the same characteristics of adjoining properties that are within townships as defined by Council’s Development Plan. Furthermore, some areas have been proposed as completely new townships for the purposes of the Environment Protection (Air Quality) Policy 2016. These are within the localities of Verdun, Inglewood and Greenhill.

What does declaring the township boundaries mean?

Declaration of townships for the purposes of the Environment Protection (Air Quality) Policy 2016 delineates where a permit must be obtained within these townships for the purposes of burning agriculture or forestry waste, burning off vegetation for fire prevention or control and burning vegetation for any other purpose.


What doesn’t declaring the township boundaries mean?

Declaration of the proposed township boundaries will have no effect on the application of Council’s Development Plan, zoning or any other matter related to planning and development (i.e. there will be no change to the zoning or development potential of allotments contained within the proposed township boundaries).

Why have Greenhill, Verdun and Inglewood be proposed as townships for the purposes of Council’s draft Burning Permit Policy and the Environment Protection (Air Quality) Policy 2016?

Greenhill, Verdun and Inglewood have been proposed as townships for the purposes of Council’s draft Burning Permit Policy and the Environment Protection (Air Quality) Policy 2016 as they exhibit the same characteristics of properties within townships defined by Council’s Development Plan.   Subject to Council resolving to declare Greenhill, Verdun and Inglewood as townships for purposes of the Environment Protection (Air Quality) Policy 2016 residents within these areas would need to comply with the proposed township burning arrangements.

Draft Burning Permit Policy

Who developed the Environment Protection (Air Quality) Policy 2016 and why?

The Environment Protection (Air Quality) Policy 2016 was developed by the Environment Protection Authority to regulate air emissions including those from wood heaters and burning in the open. The intent of the Air Quality Policy is to better protect and improve the health of South Australians and the environment through improved air quality.




What does the Environment Protection (Air Quality) Policy 2016 do?

The Environment Protection (Air Quality) Policy 2016 prohibits, without a permit, burning agriculture or forestry waste, burning off vegetation for fire prevention or control and burning vegetation for any other purpose inside all townships and within the Adelaide metropolitan area.  The Environment Protection (Air Quality) Policy 2016 provides Councils with the regulatory authority to issue permits for these burning activities. Permits can be issued on an individual basis for a single property or by notice in a newspaper for an entire area.

What has Council done since the Environment Protection (Air Quality) Policy 2016 came into effect?

As much of the metropolitan Adelaide portion of the Council area is high bushfire risk Council staff worked collaboratively with the EPA to put in place an interim permit by notice in a newspaper for the Adelaide metropolitan area (excluding townships). The interim permit, issued by the EPA, authorises property owners within those parts of the Council area which fall within the Adelaide metropolitan area, and which are outside of townships, to burn without the need for a permit for a number of purposes including bushfire hazard reduction and disposal of agricultural and forestry waste. Council also developed an Interim Township Burning Permit Policy to guide the assessment of applications for township burning.

Why does Council need to develop and adopt a Burning Permit Policy?

Council requires a Burning Permit Policy to guide its regulatory authority under the Environment Protection (Air Quality) Policy 2016 and to replace the interim permit in place for the Adelaide metropolitan area and the Interim Township  Burning Permit Policy.

What are the current burning in the open arrangements that apply for townships, the Adelaide metropolitan area (excluding townships) and the non-Adelaide metropolitan area (excluding townships)?

The following burning arrangements currently apply outside the Fire Danger Season. Click here for further information on burning in the open during the Fire Danger Season.

WITHIN Townships


WITHIN Adelaide Metropolitan Area (excluding townships)

OUTSIDE Adelaide Metropolitan Area (excluding townships)


How many township permits were issued and declined in 2016?

Between 23 July 2016, when the Environment Protection (Air Quality) Policy 2016came into effect, and 30 November 2016 (the commencement of the Fire Danger Season), 334 permits were issued and 18 permit applications were refused.

What does the draft Burning Permit Policy propose for townships and why?

The Draft Burning Permit Policy proposes the same controls that currently exist for townships. I.e. a permit would be required for burning agriculture or forestry waste, burning off vegetation for fire prevention or control and burning vegetation for any other purpose. This approach is considered justifiable given the higher population densities within township areas, the generally reduced bushfire fuel load in these areas and access to a fortnightly kerbside green organics collection service.

Will there be a fee for township burning permit applications?

Council is not currently proposing to charge a fee for township burning permit applications.

What does the draft Burning Permit Policy propose for the Adelaide metropolitan area (excluding townships) and why?

The draft Burning Permit Policy proposes the same controls that currently exist for the Adelaide metropolitan area (excluding townships).

I.e. a permit is not required for

  • burning agriculture or forestry waste
  • burning off vegetation for fire prevention or control.
  • burning vegetation comprising dry wood or other dry plant material in a brazier, chiminea, or fire pit in the open for domestic heating
  • lighting or maintaining a fire in the open using vegetation comprising dry wood or other dry plant material for a camp fire or barbeque in the course of camping, scouting or a similar outdoor recreational activity.

A permit would be required for burning vegetation for any other purpose.

This approach is considered justifiable given the high bushfire risk, generally large allotment sizes, lower population density  and no access to a fortnightly kerbside green organics collection service.

What does the draft Burning Permit Policy propose for the non-Adelaide metropolitan area (excluding townships)and why?

For those residents outside the Adelaide metropolitan area (excluding townships) the introduction of the Environment Protection (Air Quality) Policy 2016has seen little change in the burning rules applicable to them. These residents can undertake the following burning activities without the need to obtain a permit from Council:

  • Burning agriculture or forestry waste
  • Burning off vegetation for fire prevention or control
  • Burning charcoal, dry wood or other dry plant material in a brazier, chiminea or fire pit in the open for domestic heating
  • Lighting or maintaining a fire in the open using charcoal, dry wood or other plant material for a campfire or barbeques in the course of camping, scouting or a similar outdoor recreational activity
  • Burning of vegetation for any other purpose.

Any resident living outside the Adelaide metropolitan area (excluding townships) wishing to burn for any purpose other than those outlined above would require a permit from Council.

What are the differences between the current burning in the open arrangements and those proposed in the draft policy?

There are no differences between the current burning arrangements and those proposed in Council’s draft Burning Permit Policy.



What polices and regulatory controls will the Burning Permit Policy replace/supersede?

The draft Burning Permit Policy, subject to Council adoption, will replace the current interim EPA permit for the Adelaide metropolitan area (excluding townships) and Council’s Interim Township Burning Permit Policy.

Will Council’s Burning Permit Policy apply during the fire danger season?

No. The issuing of permits under the Environment Protection (Air Quality) Policy 2016 is only applicable outside of the fire danger season, generally from 1 December to 30 April each year. Any permit applications received during the fire danger season will be assessed pursuant with the Fire and Emergency Services Act 2005.

Is Council going to review its green organic services in response to the draft Burning Permit Policy?

A report on the future provision of green organic disposal services will be provided to Council following the community consultation on Council’s draft Burning Permit Policy. This approach will ensure any feedback received during the draft Burning Permit consultation on green waste disposal is considered when making recommendations to Council on green organic services.